Sustainable Forests. Healthy Communities.

Renewable Products for America's Needs.

About AFRC

AFRC is a regional trade association whose purpose is to advocate for sustained yield timber harvests on public timberlands throughout the West to enhance forest health and resistance to fire, insects, and disease. We do this by promoting active management to attain productive public forests, protect adjoining private forests, and assure community stability. We work to improve federal and state laws, regulations, policies and decisions regarding access to and management of public forest lands and protection of all forest lands.

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Recent Press Releases

Build a House; Frame a Future Trailer

The Oregon Forest Resources Institute is producing a special video, Build a H

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AFRC Hiring SW Oregon Field Forester

Do you love being outdoors and in the woods?  Are you passionate about the local forest products industry and its contributi

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AFRC Asks Interior Secretary to Review Cascade-Siskiyou National Monument Expansion

Today, AFRC President Travis Joseph sent a letter to Secretary of the Interior Zinke requesting that he review the Cascade-Si

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Recent Newsletters

April 2017 Newsletter

Washington, D.C. Updates New Oversight of the Antiquities Act AFRC 2017 Annual Meeting - Building Success Big Wi

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March 2017 Newsletter

Updates from Washington, D.C. AFRC Files Suit Against Illegal Cascade-Siskiyou Monument Expansion Court Overturns D

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February 2017 Newsletter

Save the Date: AFRC's Annual Meeting, April 18-20 Washington, D.C. Updates Deadline Near for WA DNR DEIS Comments

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Washington State

experienced record fire years in both 2014 and 2015, with over 1,000,000 acres burning last year alone.

The Rim Fire

on the Stanislaus National Forest in California released over 11 million metric tons of greenhouse gas – the same pollution as 2,300,000 cars.

The U.S. Forest Service

once generated $1,000,000,000 in revenues every year, but now spends $2 for every $1 it produces.

An estimated 60-80 million

acres of our National Forests are overstocked and at risk of catastrophic wildfire, insects, and disease.

Featured Facts & Research Article

In the Inland Northwest, where the forest land base is dominated by federal ownership and the forests are managed for a multitude of benefits, life cycle analysis suggests that the optimal solution for maximizing carbon gain under both current and future climate conditions is to manage forests to maximize long-lived wood products and to minimize the risk of severe wildfires